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  1. #1
    James's Avatar
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    Using multiple mics...

    I have read and heard that it is a bad idea to record a lead vocal with multiple mics. Aside from obvious phase issues. I can't really understand why this practice isn't more common? I mean, we use multiple mics on other instruments like the snare drum to fill out the spectrum and add more depth so why not do the same with a vocal setup? I know that with a great mic pre and the right mic it is hardly needed anyway but this particular taboo in audio recording has me curious! Has anyone experimented with using more than one mic for a single vocal track? If so, what were your results?

    Your thoughts please......

  2. #2
    NickolasM.'s Avatar
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    James, what would happen with this... depending on where the Mic. is located. there will be echo... If you talk directly into one and theres another Mic. a few inches away it would be like a echo. So what a 'lagg' if you want to call it that.

  3. #3
    James's Avatar
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    Not if you use headphones ;) No echo can be made unless an output is present. Im not sure if a microphone can be delayed unless ones put through an effects processor.

  4. #4
    jkemr's Avatar
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    Yes i must agree with james i have use 2 mics with headsets and no echo no feedback and the other person was sat right next to me

  5. #5
    StreamAlerts's Avatar
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    Placing two types of mics close to the vocalist is good if you want to be able to choose one or the other for different sounds. However if you tried to mix the two together, you would get comb filtering that makes it much harder to understand what the vocalist is saying. For voice-over work, you usually want a crisp, clear signal that you can play with later, so one close mic is best. In the studio though, they'll often put up a second mic farther away in order to mix in some room acoustics. Also, the mic pattern has tons of affect on the sound so that a single vocal mic can produce a range of different tones based on the pattern you choose.
    Oh, and for really noisy situations or press conferences, they'll often use two closely spaced mics with one wired out of phase of the other to cancel out extraneous noise and make the speaker's voice come through cleaner.

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