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Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation.


KHUK

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Please note that this is NOT directed towards anyone and is NOT intended to insult or make fun of ANYONE.

 

The most common mistake people make when using Punctuation is the misuse of apostrophise.

 

Example One

 

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said thats a wrap.

 

Some of you seem to forget that there should be an apostrophe before the ‘S’ in the word ‘That’s’ because you’re shorting two words from ‘that is’ to ‘that’s.’

 

Long version - correct

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said that is a wrap.

 

Short version - correct

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said that’s a wrap.

 

Incorrect version

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said thats a wrap.

 

Example Two

 

You are, your and you’re

 

‘You’re’ is short for ‘you are’

 

Here is an example,

 

Incorrect version

Your teacher gave you a grade ‘D’ in English because your thick.

 

Long version - correct

Your teacher gave you a grade ‘D’ in English because you are thick.

 

Short version - correct

Your teacher gave you a grade ‘D’ in English because you’re thick.

 

Example Three

 

What are the differences between there and their?

 

When to use the word ‘there,’

 

He’d seen me from a distance and I shouted to my friends, ‘hey, he’s over there.’

 

When to use the word ‘their,’

 

He had their football and wouldn’t give it back.

 

I know this might not seem important to forum users, but the nature of Broadcasting World attracts professionals from all types of media backgrounds.

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The most common mistake people make when using Punctuation is the misuse of apostrophise.

 

Example One

 

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said thats a wrap.

 

Some of you seem to forget that there should be an apostrophe before the ‘S’ in the word ‘That’s’ because you’re shorting two words from ‘that is’ to ‘that’s.’

 

Long version - correct

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said that is a wrap.

 

Short version - correct

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said that’s a wrap.

 

Incorrect version

Before it was time for me to leave the studio the engineer said thats a wrap.

 

Example Two

 

You are, your and you’re

 

‘You’re’ is short for ‘you are’

 

Here is an example,

 

Incorrect version

Your teacher gave you a grade ‘D’ in English because your thick.

 

Long version - correct

Your teacher gave you a grade ‘D’ in English because you are thick.

 

Short version - correct

Your teacher gave you a grade ‘D’ in English because you’re thick.

 

Example Three

 

What are the differences between there and their?

 

When to use the word ‘there,’

 

He’d seen me from a distance and I shouted to my friends, ‘hey, he’s over there.’

 

When to use the word ‘their,’

 

He had their football and wouldn’t give it back.

 

I know this might not seem important to forum users, but the nature of Broadcasting World attracts professionals from all types of media backgrounds.

 

So your gifted and you can spell using good punctuation and your point is what?

 

Try to understand if you will, people less fortunate than you dyslexia prehaps or from another country trying there best to get across what they want the best they can.

 

looks different a little bit now prehaps ?

 

 

Frank

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So your gifted and you can spell using good punctuation and your point is what?

 

Try to understand if you will, people less fortunate than you dyslexia prehaps or from another country trying there best to get across what they want the best they can.

 

looks different a little bit now prehaps ?

 

 

Frank

 

I will make this very clear, this thread was by no means intended to insult anyone so please don’t take it personally.

 

I understand Broadcasting World has members from all parts of the world and not just the Anglosphere. As dyslexia is also quite common among people I also took that into consideration when I created this topic, on behalf of the voice-over professionals who are forever exposed to half arsed scripts from people who can’t be bothered to use the spell checker.

 

I don’t know how long you’ve been in the voice-over business but I for one am speaking on behalf of that industry who receive scripts everyday with these common errors. It’s not professional is it?

 

Another fact is that Broadcasting World attracts a wide variety of professionals who find it off putting when they see this on a website designed for an industry that should be creating new standards.

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Guys dont take this to heart. The internet is now common for spelling mistakes and short words (EG: you = u). This has crossed over in the voiceover industry as the internet is one of the most largest ways of communicating to a voiceover professional.

 

Its not that hard to run over a spell checker before posting a script, sure you dont need to do it posting on a forum or anything but there are certain standards. Spelling and punctuation makes recording and getting voiceovers easier!

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Well I have to agree with Kris, even I'm not a native English speaker, for reason that I'm from Belgium

I can understand very good, and I can imagine that some text who has to be understood as "guide" for an ID, liner etc ... looks even to Me as Belgian sometimes very very bad.

 

I agree that "language" at a forum can live for a part its own life ex: to You aka 2U etc etc

but it's also a fact that every language has their own difficulties and nobody is perfect ...

English is accepted worldwide as basic language to communicate ...

but there are major differences in the writing of words who have the same meaning if these are written by an US or UK citizen, to both countries the pronouncing of the same word can have an other meaning ..

ex: I had once an over the top example for the word "douche" (who's basicly a French word !) ... I used it once into a conversation to a girl of the UK ("not" online, but it happend at London) .. result = normal conversation .. however used to an US girl it can become a whole other meaning .. Don't ask Me to explain it .. just believe Me .. it happend to Me into "real" life

 

Imagine Yourself that from this moment on they decide to make the basic internet language French, German, Dutch etc etc

I guess lots of forums can close their doors at once

Visit and listen @ BW !

http://i.imgur.com/Ggmw4ub.gif

 

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I have yet to speak to a voice artist who does not agree with the contents of this thread. My intention was to highlight the common mistakes some of you make when writing scripts. Not for one moment was it referring to the way one might write in this forum or any other forum for that matter.

 

Thank you to James, Johnnie and Marc for clearing up the confusion, I appreciate that.

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Guest Baabaa Productions

Kris as always you raise some interesting points. My wife is a teacher so I must be careful what I say, however, in schools in the UK they now appear to be taking a more relaxed view of punctuation ....certainly more relaxed compared to the days I remember at school. Also we have different forms of communication ie emails and texts which encourage us to leave out punctuation in order to save time. What is worse for me is the use of abbreviations in texts and emails which usually make the message incomprehensible(something I have told my daughter many times).

So I think the issue of punctuation is much wider than on this site I think it is a general issue and yes it may not be professional but I fear it is becoming acceptable as we cut corners and have less and less time to formulate our communication.

Mark.

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Puntctuation.

 

Standard set of marks used in written and printed texts to clarify meaning and to separate sentences, words, and parts of words. It often marks discourse features such as intonational contours and pauses. It may also convey information about a word (e.g., hyphens in compound words) unrelated to speech patterns. In English, the period (. ) marks the end of a sentence or an abbreviation. The comma ( ,) usually separates clauses, phrases, or items in a series. The colon (: ) often introduces an explanation or series of examples. The semicolon (; ) usually separates independent clauses. The em-dash ( — ) marks an abrupt transition. The exclamation point (!) signals surprise. The question mark (? ) signals a question. The apostrophe (') marks the possessive case or the omission of letters. Quotation marks (" " ) set off either quoted words or words used with special significance. Interpolations in a sentence are marked by brackets ([ ]) or parentheses ( ).

 

But seriously do we need to be this perfect ?

 

Sorry about the spaces here and there as im sure you know punctuation also makes emoticons

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Guest Baabaa Productions

Frank you make a good point. No it does not need to be perfect here.....however I worked for a multi national company and when we received job applications( usually from graduates) which had poor punctuation and spelling they did not make the first round of interviews......so thats when it becomes important. Me (I have fallen into bad habits and I can be lazy I am only human) it does not bother me as long as the message comes over but for others it can have a different effect.

Mark

 

 

Puntctuation.

 

But seriously do we need to be this perfect ?

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It’s extremely important that you include the correct pronunciation, grammar, spelling and punctuation when writing a script. You would not pick up a newspaper or magazine with these same common mistakes.

 

Writers for TV and Radio would not get commissioned if the script is full of these errors, it’s not professional. These types of jobs fall under the category of the media industry, and we should be setting the example for the rest to follow.

 

Mark so kindly pointed out that if you want to be taken seriously then spending more time on the above is a good idea indeed.

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These types of jobs fall under the category of the media industry, and we should be setting the example for the rest to follow.

 

Mark so kindly pointed out that if you want to be taken seriously then spending more time on the above is a good idea indeed.

 

Thats a fair point. Im going to :Z: it.

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Twice you have expressed your view on this matter, both times you were unprofessional and insulting before being isolated by the forum moderators.

Yes, I’m from Yorkshire and no I don’t have the stereotypical Yorkshire accent that you’ve put across to me.

 

If you read very carefully you will see that this thread is by no means regarding the way one might write in this forum, but has in fact everything to do with script writing - something which every voice talent agrees on.

 

If a script required an accent from Yorkshire it would be written that way. This thread is not regarding accents from Yorkshire or any other regional accent for that matter. It’s basic, straightforward English that’s taught in schools whether you’re from Yorkshire, Birmingham, London or Scotland.

 

From my own experience and judging by the way you present yourself, you really have not got the right attitude for this business and you will probably find out the hard way.

 

Good luck to you, fozzy!

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I agree with what you stated but I come across tons of scripts that are poorly written. That's because half of my work is from hobby broadcasters and club dj's. I simply run spell check and re write the script and give it back to them to approve. It's not THAT important to me to receive a script with incorrect punctuation, though it would be nice to not have to re write it, but after all, it makes myself look more 'professional' to correct script mistakes. Not all of my clients are 'pros' which is why I lax on this, but I see where your coming from and there is no reason for anyone to be offended, its just a simple English lesson :)

 

Thats my input.

-JB

Jon Bova

 

"Successful people have libraries. The rest have big screen TVs. - Jim Rohn"

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Great feedback, John. I do agree that some potential clients are new to the industry which is why I created this thread to make life easier for voice professionals to reply to a request on Broadcasting World.
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Here is my final thought on this subject, Well for now anyway.

Im the first to admit my spelling, grammer and punctuation really suck and having been told this when i first started here ( not bring up old disagreements) But i have to say regardless of how this thread may or may not be percieved, we are all adults and we should behave in that way.

Yes i have posted here ranting about this and that but in all fairness this is a pretty good and informative thread

 

Regards

 

Frank

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Guest Baabaa Productions

I agree Frank lets all be adults on this site. What is great is to have a discussion and being able to express your opinion. What is not acceptable is when rude personal comments are made and this is not acceptable.

 

So lets have opinions from everyone and leave rude comments for the playground.

 

 

Mark

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